Our journey through autism

Posts tagged ‘SLP’

Other Progress

The summer was all about IM and SLP, after those programs finished he continued regular OT.

Occupational therapy: Bilal had major improvements since last year and we thought he was getting close to discharge, every time this comes up, I get super excited to be finally done with it all, but also really nervous, afraid to stop therapy but still need it. His evaluation came up beginning of September and he did well, but still had weaknesses with hand/eye coordination and more visual aspects of OT. Also his handwriting does need improvement so it was determined to continue with OT for at least another year and then re-evaluate again.

Vision therapy: Bilal did once a week vision therapy for the prescribed 6 month program and did really well and strengthened his eyes. She told us to continue with some therapies at home and come back in once a month and then once every 3 months just to keep track and make sure of things. Future therapies would require a bit more maturity to do activities like the 90s popular Magic Eye, relaxing and pulling certain eye muscles to see hidden images. She also said the light box therapy of SLP would be beneficial for Bilal’s convergence and eye teaming issues. In all honesty we haven’t kept up with our vision therapy exercises like we should. We really need to add it back in somehow because his OT and PT therapists say he’ll either need glasses or more vision therapy.

Magic-eyes-magic-eye-16383884-2551-1681

Magic Eye*

Physical Therapy: Earlier in the year Bilal was temporarily discharged from PT, he wasn’t gaining anymore from it, but the evaluation test didn’t give us a good score. There is a test for below 6 years old, that Bilal (then 6 years old) did great on. The other test for above 6 year old, he did really bad on. His therapist suggested to re-test him after he completed his summer intensive to really see whether he would need more PT or not but in the mean time we would put therapy on hold. Mid-September he was re-evaluated for PT on the 6+ years test and he did great, passed on all areas and she said the IM made a huge difference with speed, precision and overall focus and attention.

Myofunctional: We are still doing myofunctional therapy once a week, almost ready to move on to phase 2 swallows. Its a slow therapy, as its hard to change eating habits, something that has to be done every day and he can satisfy his hunger even if he eats incorrectly. A change like this has to be a conscious effort from Bilal himself and there is just no 5-7 year old that would bother unless his mother constantly reminds him.

Speech: He was discharged from private speech therapy in June 2013 and from school based speech therapy at the end of Kindergarten. He is speaking clearly with vast vocabulary and infrequent grammatical errors. His OT therapist suggested that he be evaluated for speech again which concerned me and it turns out that the specialists are called Speech and Language pathologists, and he needs help with the language part now not speech and articulation. Bilal has major trouble writing and putting together a sentence, he may know the answer verbally, but tell him to write it down and he’s lost, he cannot organize his thoughts into words to be written. Like with everything else, things don’t come naturally to Bilal, he has to be taught and trained to do things, to have tasks broken down into smaller parts, and then put all together in time as he masters each little goal. He will be evaluated next month and depending on the results on that will be taught how to organize his thoughts and write them, for example, creating word boxes, learning sentence parts, editing and proof reading, its like an English language lesson but therapy. This is exactly what Bilal needs, with homework he either has no clue what to write or he talks too much and doesn’t directly answer what the question is asking for. Looking forward to this therapy, the therapist I met said that after 6 weeks with her we’d see improvements. She’ll help him with his homework and give him tips and tricks.

Other activities: Bilal is still doing piano lessons, with a recital twice a year, he’s on his 3rd piano book now and is doing well, we went through a period where he refused to practice and a lot of crying, screaming drama but a bit after the SLP his attitude improved and his behavior during class is a bit more serious as well. Other than that, he has a science and technology after school class once a week, concentrating on how science sometimes appears as if its magic (getting an egg through a bottle) and then later on basic programming and robotics involving Lego. He also goes to Sunday school every week learning about Islam doing really well there and little by little trying to teach him some basic Arabic words, proper pronunciation is very difficult for him but he understands us well.

Overall like all his teachers and therapists keep saying Bilal is a happy typical little boy, loves computer games, Lego Mixels and just being silly and funny.

* The image that appears in the above Magic Eye is that of penguins.

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Sensory Learning Program

Sensory Learning Program is another part of Bilal’s intensive summer therapies. SLP is really quite complicated to explain and sometimes seems like I’m talking science fiction, and whether it works and makes a difference is difficult to tell. I’ll try my best to explain it:

To learn anything new you acquire information mainly through, sight (vision), sound (auditory) and motion (vestibular) of course there are the other senses that you gain information from, but from a sensory point of view those are the 3 systems. The 3 systems have to be in sync, working together at the same time and the same intensity to truly learn. If one of them is weaker you miss important information, and if one of them is too strong you focus more on that information instead of gaining a complete picture. SLP aims to reset the 3 systems and train them to work together at the same strength, and it does this by using lights, sounds and motion, with the use of a sensory table.

Before therapy begins, the individual is given a brain scan to draw a map of brain electrical pulses. Print outs of reds, greens and blue, showing which areas of the brain are the most active and which are the least active. Talk about alpha, beta, delta waves, etc. The technician who ran the test is what you could only call a brain geek, she was fascinated with the results and went on and on talking about all the different waves and strengths, it was way above my head. Something I picked up was the reason for Bilal’s constant movement (vestibular) he has to constantly stay in motion (fidgeting, walking around) to awaken his brain to think and learn, if he pauses his brain falls asleep. This is what happens with ADHD. From those results they were able to understand how Bilal’s brain worked and could come up with a plan for treatment. They would choose certain light and sound frequencies to expose Bilal to that would activate the weak spots on his brain. Another test they run before treatment, is a “listening profile” they have Bilal listen to certain beeps or sounds at different frequencies to again determine his weaknesses and strengths and expose him to the right sounds during treatment. In short this therapy is like resetting the brain where its all balanced and able to use information efficiently and improve learning.

Therapy is divided into 2 parts, in office and at home. The in office part lasts for 18 days. For 18 days Bilal had to go to the clinic, half an hour in the morning and half an hour in the late afternoon to lay on the sensory table, look at a light and listen to sounds through headphones. The table is like a big bed that slowly turns, up and around downwards and up again, very slowly to trigger the vestibular system. There is a light box above his head that displays different colors (ruby-red, magenta, yellow-green, green-blue, etc) each color has a different frequency that activates his visual system. Finally he listens to different sounds played at different frequencies through large over ear headphones, to strengthen his auditory system.Each person reacts differently to this therapy depending on their starting point, but in general each color or frequency triggers a certain emotion or part of the brain. Examples:

  • the color magenta which helps regulate emotional senses and relaxes the visual system
  • the red and ruby color which stimulate the cerebellum which is responsible for the integration of auditory and movement information. This color also addresses visual processing, promoting convergence and eye teaming to look at a single object
  • the color yellow-green which address motor planning and expressive verbal communication

Some of them are almost instantly, the day of the yellow-green exposure Bilal was telling stories, re-telling a cartoon episode he saw in detail. Other times emotions would show up by the end of the day. It’s really interesting to say the least.

In the middle of the 18 days, another “listening profile” is done to see improvements and to determine other frequencies to play for the second week.

The second part of the therapy like I said is an at home program. For 12 days (total of 30) twice a day, 20 minutes in the morning and 20 before bed, Bilal goes sits in a darkened room or closet and looks at a light box that emits a steady phasing in and out magenta light. This part of the therapy had less side effects or emotional outbursts.

Like I said this therapy is like a reset of the brain, some children its like a switch was turned on and improvements are instant, but for the majority improvements happen over time, small changes with behavior, attitude, learning over several months. It takes time for the brain to re-wire and organize itself to learn more efficiently with past information and with new information.

Before we did this therapy I chatted with someone on a forum and she said she didn’t see any improvements with her son, but still felt it worthwhile, this therapy was not covered by insurance, a $3000 out of pocket expense, also the time required for twice daily clinic visits and twice daily quite time at home is exhausting for both you and your child. Did we benefit? Its hard to say for sure, at the same time he was doing IM, that had a benefit, did the SLP help with it? don’t know… He has had improvements with attitude, anger or frustration is diffused faster, he’s a little calmer, bed wetting is no longer every single night, its every 4 or 5 nights now. Next month we’re due for a post-SLP brain scan, to see any differences or improvements. I would say it was worth it, we don’t regret it, and you should look into it too.

http://www.sensorylearning.com/program.php

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sensory+learning+program

Welcome Back

Hello everyone,

Welcome back, I’ve left the world of blogging and just got busy with life and raising 2 little boys and all that entails. So what have we been up to, I could say nothing really, doing the same as any other parent of young boys would be busy with, school, after school activities, sports, family outings, etc…  or I can concentrate on all the different therapies we’ve done and those have been interesting.

Where have I left off? That we’ve just started Kindergarten and things were looking great… now we’ve started 1st grade almost 2 months ago and alhamdullah its been going really well. Bilal did really well in an integrated classroom last year with typical peers. He still had an IEP that covered speech goals, OT goals and language arts special needs. He had trouble writing and was pulled out of class for an hour to get help with writing assignments. He learned to read mashaAllah and within class he was in the top reading and math group. He had friends in class and on the bus. Just overall a great first year of official school. By the end of the year he was discharged from school based speech therapy and promoted to first grade along with his peers with the remainder of his IEP goals.

During the summer we were busy with 2 different intensive therapies so we weren’t able to join any summer camps except for a 3 week pre-Ramadan Islamic camp. In the coming weeks I will dedicate a blog post to each of those therapies. Interactive Metronome (IM) and the Sensory Learning Program (SLP). InshaAllah I will try to keep the blog up-to-date and current as the original purpose of the blog was to help others taking the same journey and help them learn from our experiences and learn about the different therapies available for their children.

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