Our journey through autism

Posts tagged ‘reading’

Vision Therapy

It appears that all of Bilal’s fine motor muscles skills are affected by his autism or by his under-development in the womb. At age 3 we learned that he had fine motor issues in his hands and was unable to do anything precise or even hold a crayon or children’s scissors correctly. Alhamdullah that has been remedied by two years of occupational therapy. At age 4 we realized that one of the reasons his speech was affected and also his eating habits was due to weak tongue and mouth muscles, he’s been doing myofunctional therapy for a little over a year now and has somewhat improved. This year at age 5 we’ve come to notice that he’s having trouble seeing properly, we go through a couple evaluations and his eye muscles are weak which means he needs vision therapy to strengthen them. He has 20/20 vision but his eyes arent working together, they tire and lose focus quickly and tend to wander outwards. We always noticed that his right eye may wander sometimes especially when he was tired, but the eye doctor we were seeing said that as long as it didnt get worse we’ll just monitor it. Lately though his OT and PT therapists noticed he was having trouble staying on task and that he was tilting his head to the side to perform certain tasks which they suspected was due to a convergence/divergence issue. Also his dad noticed that he was afraid of heights or didn’t enjoy the rock climbing classes because he had trouble seeing what was expected of him. We first visit Dr. Free at the eye center at our local Costco. She performed all the typical eye exam tests but the bit extra was having him do some eye tracking computer game. She concluded that he does in fact require therapy and she suggested a Dr. Cook in the Marietta area or Dr. Iyer in Roswell. So I forwarded the report to Dr. Iyer and set up an appointment. We went in this week and she performed similar tests and some things that were new to us. She got his left eye to wander, the first time I’ve seen it and when it does wander he sees double. She said this was actually better than just one eye cause if it was just one that one would be very weak and require a lot of therapy but when he switches them maybe for distance or closeness that means they are both equally weak and wont require as much therapy. He also has binocular issues which mean his eyes don’t team together, they work separately so that would affect his reading and copying something off a board, also may impact sports. So right now she’s recommended 36 weeks of once a week therapy with an at home program to further practice the skills learnt at the office.

The medical terms for Bilal’s condition are as follows:

  • Oculomotor Dysfunction in Pursuits and Saccades (affects the ability to see where a word is on a page, and go from one word to the next)
  • Accommodative Infacility (This will cause blurred vision when reading, his eyes to fatigue when reading, headaches while reading, and make it difficult to change focus when looking in the distance (i.e., the board at school) after reading (or doing desk-work).)
  • Alternating Exotropia (wandering outward eyes)
  • Binocular Dysfunction (Bilal’s eyes have difficulty working as a team. Either eye has a tendency to drift out when looking at something in the distance. This will cause double vision, especially when looking at smaller objects. These conditions will also make it more difficult when Bilal is learning to read, since the words may look double to him.
  • Convergence Insufficiency

I always feel like we should have done this sooner always being told early intervention is key to improvement of symptoms, getting therapy at 3 is better than at 4 and 4 better than at 5 etc… That constant feeling of mommy guilt. But alhamdullah getting treatment now at this age is just perfect, right before the start of Kindergarten and right before he actually starts learning to read and real academic learning or serious sport playing.

When school starts I need to make sure this is included in his IEP. It’s stated that his right eye wanders when tired but that was it, just a small note. These were some of the doctor’s classroom suggestions for Bilal’s vision issues.

Recommendation for classroom:

  1. Reduce conflicting peripheral stimuli. Removing materials unrelated to the task will increase attention.
  2. Encourage your student to use his finger to follow the line of print when reading, if necessary. (A marker assists, but directs tactile finger contact with movement will offer greater support.)
  3. Printed material should be copied to larger size to reduce visual stress and fatigue
  4. Reduce the number of items on a page to reduce visual overload.
  5. Short visual work periods will tend to reduce visual stress and fatigue and the resultant difficulty with attention.
  6. Promote a reading and writing distance equal to the length of your student’s arm from elbow to middle knuckle (Harmon distance).
  7. This child has extreme difficulty with visual-motor tasks, such as handwriting. Please keep this in mind for all activities that involve eye-hand coordination

These recommendations may no longer be necessary once the program of optometric vision therapy is complete.

And finally here is some suggested reading or websites that the doctor recommended so we could better understand his diagnosis.

Suggested Reading:

  1.  Fixing My Gaze by Susan R. Barry.  2009
  2. Moro Reflex: A teachers window into a child’s mind. By Sally Goddard
  3.  College of Optometrists in Vision Development www.covd.org
  4. Optometric Extension Program Foundation www.oepf.org
  5. Vision Care and Therapy Center www.learningisvisual.com
Advertisements

Tag Cloud